Bundala National Park

Bundala National Park is perhaps the most important wetland in Sri Lanka for both resident and migratory birds. It is famous for its aquatic birdlife which feed on the rich harvest provided by the numerous lagoons
throughout the park. The park covers some 6,216 ha and during the winter months more than 160 species of birds can be found within its boundaries. The park is the last refuge of the Great Flamingo in this part of the Island and encountering one of the huge flocks of Flamingo’s can be truly breathtaking. Among some of the birding highlights are the rare Black-necked stork and the Great Thick-knee, and the more common Painted Storks, Pelicans, Egrets, Herons, Water Hens, Spoon Bills, Open Bills, Cormorants, Lapwings and Sand Pipers

 Bundala National Park is perhaps the most important wetland in Sri Lanka for both resident and migratory birds. It is famous for its aquatic birdlife which feed on the rich harvest provided by the numerous lagoons throughout the park. The park covers some 6,216 ha and during the winter months more than 160 species of birds can be found within its boundaries. The park is the last refuge of the Great Flamingo in this part of the Island and encountering one of the huge flocks of Flamingo’s can be truly breathtaking. Among some of the birding highlights are the rare Black-necked stork and the Great Thick-knee, and the more common Painted Storks, Pelicans, Egrets, Herons, Water Hens, Spoon Bills, Open Bills, Cormorants, Lapwings and Sand Pipers.

 

 Plicans  & Painted Storks taking flight

 Situated in the dry-zone, this sanctuary is cut off from the Indian Ocean by a wide beach and fringing dunes. The park is a mixture of dry semi-evergreen forest, scrub jungle and wetland habitat with shallow water holes. The open habitat makes it easy to spot the herds of elephants and other animals that roam the area and cruising through the park in an open top 4-by-4 adds to the experience.

The park is also home to a small population of leopards, which prey on the numerous spotted deer and sambur. Although sightings are rare, it is worth exploring several rocky outcrops where previous sightings have occurred. There are also sloth bear, giant squirrels and civet cats and the waters are inhabited by both the marsh crocodile and the ‘salt water’ or estuarine crocodile. From October to January several species of endangered marine turtles find their way here to lay their eggs on the shore.

The Marsh Crocodile

Bundala national park is Sri Lanka’s only declared Ramsar wetland and honoured internationally for its significant role for hosting over 20,000 shorebirds at any given time from August to April. Every species of water bird found in the country is said to visit this national park.

Elephants, deer, wild buffalo, and around 150 species of resident and migratory birds can be seen in the park. Out of the 150 species of migratory and resident birds, 45 are waders (associated with the lagoons, tidal mud flats and salterns).

Apart from several species of waterfowl, the rare Black-necked stork and Great Thick-knee are particular birding highlights. It is easy to spot the Blue-tailed Bee-eater, Spoonbill, Red Shank, Green Shank, Spot-billed Pelican, Blue-faced Malkoha, Brahminy Kite, Crested Hawk eagle and Brown Shrike, to name but a few.

Migratory birds such as Asiatic Golden Plover, Avocet, Black Tail Godwit, Broad Billed Sand Piper, Brown Headed Gull, Caspian Plover, Caspian Tern, Common Sandpiper, Common Teal, Common Tern, Curlew, Curlew Sandpiper, Garganey, Glossy Ibis, Greater Flamingo, Green Sandpiper, Green Shank, Grey Plover, Gull Billed Tern, Kentish Plover, Large Crested Tern, Large Sand Plover, Lesser Sand Plover, Little Ringed Plover, Little Stint, Little Tern, Marsh Sand Piper, Oystercatcher, Pintail, Pintail Snipe, Red Knot, Red –necked Phalarope, Red Shank, Ringed Plover, Roseate Tern, Ruff, Sanderling, Shoveller, Spotted Red Shank, Temminck’s stint, Terek Sandpiper, Turnstone, Whimbrel, Whiskered Tern and Wood sandpiper can be seen at the park.

The resident birds such as Black Bittern, Black necked Stork, Black winged Stilt, Cattle Egret, Great Stone Plover, Grey Heron, Indian Darter, Indian Shag, Lesser Adjutant, Little Cormorant, Little Egret, Little Grebe, Little Green Heron, Median Egret, Moorhen, Night Heron, Open Bill Stork, Painted Stork, Pheasant-tailed Jacana, Pond Heron, Purple Coot, Purple Heron, Smaller Egret, Sppon Bill, Spotted Billed Pelican, White necked Stork, White Ibis, White-breasted water Hen and the Yellow Bittern are among the species. The migrants and vagrants make their journey from as far as Siberia.

 

 

One response to “Bundala National Park”

  1. Denwar says:

    Where is this Place located?

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Copyright © www.hdcc.lk 2012